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Austin Maestro

Austin Maestro

Take yourself back to February 1983, you are a leading journalist and sitting on your desk is a parcel, you open it up to find this ring binder inside......

Austin Rover Group Maestro Launch Catalogue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not for Publication until 1st March 1983

THE NEW AUSTIN AND MG MAESTROS

Innovation, advanced technology, aerodynamic style, versatile packaging and exceptionally low running costs are the hall­marks of the Austin Rover Group's exciting new Maestro, a compact, five-door, front-wheel-drive hatchback which, by virtue of a specification which transcends the traditional sector split, will forge a broad arrow into the medium sector market.

Maestro's seven model range, from a 1.3 litre standard model to a sporting 110 mph plus MG 1600, is designed to capture sales from both the lower medium and upper medium sized cars in the middle ground of the new car market, a section which accounts for 60 per cent of all new car sales in the UK.

Maestro's advanced specification and wide appeal will push the Austin Rover Group firmly into contention in the medium sector and is essential to the company's forward profitability plan, promising a favourable increase in market share.

Outstanding technological features incorporated in Maestro include:

  • Microprocessor controlled Engine Management package incorporating electronic fuel control and breakerless ignition
  • Solid state electronic instrumentation
  • Voice synthesis
  • Body colour, integrated moulded bumpers

 Austin Maestro Press Information

  • Flush glazing
  • Homofocal headlamps
  • White light front indicator lamps
  • Low rolling resistance economy tyres
  • Aerodynamically efficient shape

This remarkable combination of advanced features helps to position the Austin Rover Group firmly amongst industry leaders in technology.

Maestro the Computerised Car

Electronic Engine Management on Maestro's carburetter engines gives the efficiency benefits of electronic fuel injection with­out the cost.

An on-board microprocessor avoids fuel wastage by controlling an automatic choke to meter the exact engine condition and control the mixture accordingly, by cutting off fuel on de­celeration and, by means of an electronic idle speed control, by reducing engine idle speed.

High energy breakerless ignition is included in the management package for improved efficiency and for consistency in service.

This unique Engine Management system is fitted to all Maestros except the high performance MG.

Austin Maestro Press Information

Maestro the Talking Car 

Maestro is the first European built volume production car to offer voice synthesis as standard equipment.

Maestro actually talks to the driver, asking him or her politely, in a calm, female voice, to "Please fasten your seatbelt", or to warn of abnormal running conditions like "Handbrake on".

The 32-word voice synthesis unit supplements the electronic instrument pack and trip computer of the Vanden Plas and MG Maestro by monitoring selected operating functions and providing audible warnings when necessary. It is available as an option on some other models.

The advanced, solid state electronic instrument system has no moving parts-other than for the mileage recorder and has a processing capacity about twice that of an advanced home computer system.

Vacuum fluorescent displays are used for speed, engine revs, temperature and fuel tank contents.

The display can be converted to and from mph to kph by the push of a button.

Then move forward to September 2021

Oxford Diecast announces that the new 1:76 scale Maestro will join the range.

  Oxford Diecast Austin Maestro 76MST001 Design Cell

 A car much requested with over 600,000 manufactured.

Oxford Diecast Austin Maestro CAD 1:76 Scale

 Oxford Diecast Austin Maestro CAD

Early CAD Data for the Austin Maestro

We estimate first shots will be around late 2021 - I will keep you updated as we progress, until then it's back to 1983!!!

 

Back to 1983 Launch Pictures

Austin Maestro Launch Picture 1983 - Oxford Diecast Blog from Taff

Austin Maestro Launch Picture 1983 - Oxford Diecast Blog from Taff

Austin Maestro Launch Picture 1983 - Oxford Diecast Blog from Taff

Austin Maestro Launch Picture 1983 - Oxford Diecast Blog from Taff

Austin Maestro Launch Picture 1983 - Oxford Diecast Blog from Taff

 

 

Previous article Land Rover Discovery 1 - Development Update
Next article Oxford Land Rovers and Range Rovers at 1:76 scale.

Comments

Adam - November 7, 2021

Hi Taff. Great news. Any chance of a Montego too please?

James Malcolm Parker - October 22, 2021

When and how can I get 1:76 scale models of my Maestros? Larger scale will be a problem to store/display as I am attempting to collect all 40 odd cars I have owned. Current problem with my first models, Austin 7 Sapphire (convertible Ruby) and MG TA and Mini Pick up. Can anyone assist ?

james philip - October 16, 2021

Let’s have a 1/43 version of a 1985 1.3L in white. the dissapointing part is that it takes so long for the next new 1/43 and the wish list is endless. Sorry no spell check! Good models.

Alan Haydock - October 16, 2021

A great choice. I had three 1.3 base model Maestros between 1985 – 1993 as company cars when working as a Granada TV engineer. They were very good cars and I travelled 108k miles, 36k miles and 111k miles in successive cars in that period, including towing a small caravan for many miles in Europe and the UK. I look forward to a quality model of the Maestro and hope that the base model variant with steel bumpers can be included in the range at some point. Thanks again Oxford for producing the more mundane and also more unusual vehicles covering a massive time range on British roads.

stephen swellings - October 13, 2021

When it was at the Birmingham motor show you could not get near. Went outside there is one there in AA colours no body around.

Philip Cottle - October 11, 2021

Hi,
I look forward to get one of these model as I own two Maestros, one in a light green and in white colour. Enjoyed driving them and found them easy to do repairs to them using my Haynes manual.

It would be great to have a British Leyland series which could include Allegro 4 door variant, Montego and of course the Mini Metro. Also have them produced in the light commercial variants.

Kind Regards
Phil

David Lynn - October 10, 2021

A wry smile for Bill’s post about disintegrating door handles. My dad’s Avengers in late 70s had similar issues, which was particularly ironic as Chrysler were upgrading trim trinkets for late Avengers, with straplines in their ads claiming “More car in your hands”.

Bill - October 10, 2021

To add to my previous post about my Maestro 1.6, I was going to give my sister-in-law to be, a lift in it. She pulled the door handle and it came off in her hand. She was slightly more impressed when I was able to push the handle back on again, and open the door.
Despite it’s misdemeanors, I still have fond memories of that car. By the way, although the make was Austin, it only had “Maestro” badges on it, as I believe that Austin Rover felt that identifying the car as a British Austin would put people off buying it. (!)
Good tourquey engine, would cruise at reasonably high speed and last car I owned with a carburetor. (SU HIF44). I’ve just found the Haynes manual I used when I had the car, and it has an MOT certificate stuck inside – Oct 27, 1998, car new in 1987, and mileage 156653 – went on beyond that to around 164K I think.
I’m up for the 1:76th models for my railway, again a 1:43rd (or 1:24th!) would also be just great.

David Lynn - October 10, 2021

I used to get various basic spec Maestros allocated from the pool car fleet in the mid-late 1980s. They were generally fine and easy and comfortable enough for my motorway-munching trips, but we then got a batch of the non-turbo diesels which were appallingly bad and felt like tractor motors – the worst engine I ever came across during two decades of being allocated whatever was available from the pool or rentals.

Mac Parker - October 10, 2021

I had an early 1600 MG (BHN 1Y) which proved to be a great little car running for thousands of miles with no problems. My second 2 lit MG bought in early 1989 was unfortunately stolen after only a few weeks and written off by the perpetrators, who were never caught; so I had very little chance to enjoy this one.

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